Modul-dance experience. By Perrine Valli

Perrine Valli_Je pense comme une fille enleve sa robe © Dorothée Thébert (2)My experience with modul-dance began in 2010 at the first meeting held at the Maison de la Danse in Lyon. A group of about forty dance artists and professionals gathered there to get acquainted with each other. As opposed to what often happens, modul-dance endowed itself with the means to create a “true network” by inviting all these people to meet. Occasions rarely arise to create strong ties between structures and artists, and modul-dance came to allow just that.

What immediately struck my interest was the European dimension of this project. My company is based in two countries: Switzerland and France, and my work is deeply marked by this artistic “double life”. In each project I ask myself how these two countries, these two cultures, these two artistic worlds will influence my work. Even if they are neighbours, the politics, codes and ways of thinking of these countries differ, and this has enriched my artistic research. For example, Je pense comme une fille enlève sa robe is a piece that reflects on prostitution since this activity is legal in Switzerland and forbidden in France. In my research, I have met prostituted persons and worked in associations in both countries to understand how their practice is influenced by the political and cultural context of the countries where they live. Consequently, far from being provocative, this piece simply poses some questions and shows how the body and ways of thinking are highly subjective. Read more of this post

Interview with Itamar Serussi

Itamar Serussi was selected for the modul-dance project after being proposed by Danshuis Station Zuid Tilburg. During the modul-dance conference that took place in October 2012 in Tilburg, Serussi talked with us about Mono, the piece developed under the project and inspired while buying a pram for his newly born twins. The advertisement said “In three clicks from mono to duo”. In effect, mono is about several effects, directions, decisions and happenings coming together, and thus creating something new. Things that somehow “click” in place as well. As his own life does right now with the birth of his two kids, the international acclaim he experiences and this first chance to make a full-length dance piece for the theater.

More modul-dance videos on Numeridanse.tv.

 

 

Ben Riepe’s “Hundstage”

Ben Riepe‘s Hundstage was the first project to be premiered within the framework of modul-dance. It was acclaimed by audiences and the media alike.

This piece, for seven performers, deals with existential questions: What is left when what is real presents itself in all its artificially? When does the cynical distance to the world lose its protective smile?

Ben J. Riepe has created complex arrangements, which are defined by, on the one hand, a precise choreographic management of space, time and movement and, on the other, by the individual improvisational creativity of the performers.

www.benjriepe.com

“Episode”. By Frauke Requardt

On September 2011, Frauke Requardt wrote this text about her experience as modul-dance artist.

DSC_6736A4  Chris NashCreating Episode was an incredible rich learning experience to me. It has been the first piece of work as the sole director following on from three collaborations of different kinds. To be the only one who calls the shots, to be the one who’s vision is the centre motivation is a responsibility and a joy much different from sharing this position. It was a great reminder of what it is that I deeply care for in my art and also a pleasant surprise as I acknowledged the growth from these previous joined experiences coming into play when directing solely.

We had a residency in Dublin at Dance Ireland and a residency in Tilburg at Station Zuid as part of modul-dance. Each of those residencies brought out a surprise or an unusual perspective onto the work. There seems to be a ‘re-shuffling’ of the things you ‘know’ when placed into an unknown environment. The questioning of what I usually take for granted then seem to be what brings the new insight. There are a number of other important aspects to being away from your usual stomping ground: Firstly, there is an undivided focus for the work as interruptions from daily life are taken away. Secondly, there is an intense and intimate exchange between the people you work with. It has been a real joy and a great benefit to the work to get to know each other in this way. In which other profession do you spend three weeks in a packed house with each other, cook and eat together and share thoughts and, well, the bathroom? The residencies definitely provided for personal growth on an interpersonal level -meaning there was a learning process in the way we communicate with each other. Communication seems to be any way at the core of the creative process somehow. Read more of this post

The creation of “Home for Broken Turns”. By Ben Duke

We began the creation of Home for Broken Turns at Station Zuid in Tilburg. We had two weeks in their fantastic studio. It was a new group of dancers so it was a time to meet and explore ideas. To begin a process in a residency situation like this is, I find, invaluable. The process of getting to know each other is accelerated when you are removed from your usual environment and living together in a bungalow in the Dutch woods. I had an idea about a group of women waiting for a friend/fellow/outcast to return but those two weeks in Tilburg made it clear to me that this was a piece about a family and the dynamics of that family formed in the Station Zuid studio.

Our second modul-dance residency was more familiar to us. We spent a week at the Place Theatre in London. It was a privilege to have so much time in a theatre space and to work with the technical elements of the show.

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